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TECHNOLOGY | 2 Years Ago By Diana Adams

Wear Your Own Portable Operating System In A USB Wristband


We have written many times about how wearable tech will be one of the biggest trends of 2013, and this is another great example. How would you like to have your own portable operating system that you can carry around with you everywhere via a USB wristband? It sounds almost too good to be true, right? Well, it isn’t. The StormFly wristband, developed by Now Computing, provides exactly that. It’s like wearing a computer on your wrist.

StormFly was inspired by a team of innovators who wanted to create an alternative to cloud computing. By wearing your own portable operating system on a device which can boot off a Mac or a PC, you basically have everything you need with you at all times. There’s no need to lug around a laptop anymore. Your files, applications, games, email, Skype…everything is stored in this USB wristband.

This super fast storage device with an open source operating system also comes with an automatic backup. If for some reason your wristband gets lost or destroyed, you can retrieve the backup within 24 hours. This is one of the most brilliant new devices I’ve seen in a while.

StormFly is in the middle of a massive Kickstarter campaign right now. They are trying to raise $100,000, and we’ll see at the end of 25 days if they are able to reach their goal. By pledging $59, you will get your own StormFly customized with your name or company name on it. If you watch the video below, you’ll see why this would be such an innovative, smart solution for so many people. I’m still trying to wrap my brain around what it would be like to have everything I need and want available to access from a wristband. I think everyone should have their own portable operating system. It just makes sense.

Stormfly: Wearable, Portable Operating System In A USB Wristband



Via: [psfk]


One Comment


February 6th, 2013

This is useless, I’ve been using a standard 16G thumbdrive to boot Mint Linux from for months. It’s smaller, lighter and cheaper than this.


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