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36 Pictures Of The Construction Of The Titanic
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36 Pictures Of The Construction Of The Titanic

5 Years Ago By Richard Darell

The tragic events that transpired on April 14th, 1912 after the unsinkable ship called the Titanic collided with an iceberg and sealed the fate of 1,517 people have become a legendary reminder of how fragile technology can be despite our beliefs that everything has been foreseen. It is also one of movie history’s most successful films ever. In two days, it will be 100 years since that groundbreaking engineering feat went out on its maiden voyage and met her ultimate doom. It’s a tragic saga that will most likely travel through time like a passed down memory of how seemingly simple human mistakes are sometimes the only things needed in order for a catastrophe to grip its claws around our lives.

There is another thing to be learned here, and that is that nothing is impossible. At the time when the Titanic was put down on paper and of course when the ship itself was built, the world thought that such a vessel, weighing in at 52,310 tons, couldn’t float. But as time went on, and the ship eventually became sea ready, the world was in awe at the wondrous feat. The architects of the ship assured everyone that the ship was unsinkable.

We have all heard the story, and although we are all mesmerized by the tragic events, have we ever had the opportunity to see the construction of this historic accomplishment itself? Have a look at these 36 vintage photographs that show the Titanic being built from the ground up. It’s a thing of mammoth proportions, and you don’t have to look long and hard to understand the scale of this breathtaking vessel.

This event has been covered numerous times throughout the years since she sank to the bottom. It so happens that the iceberg that was probably the cause of her demise has actually been photographed. You can clearly see the marks left by Titanic on its right side. It’s amazing how such a “small” thing can do such heavy damage on an epic build like Titanic which was made out of pure steel. The picture was taken 4 days after the accident which makes it even more eerie.

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The Iceberg That Probably Sank Titanic

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Via: [Caveman Circus]

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4 Comments

John

January 26th, 2013

Such a beautiful ship! Full of luxury!

[Reply]

Lyn Moffett

November 23rd, 2013

Heartbreaking the loss of so many lives simply because Ismay wanted his name in print by claiming the fastest crossing. . He should have been thrown overboard when discovered dressed as a woman to get rescued… coward

[Reply]

Rob Davis

January 10th, 2016

Historians and most Titanic aficionados agree that there were many contributing reasons for this disaster, and changing even one of them would have saved most or all of those on board. However, the most damning was that the ship simply was going too fast for conditions. The lookouts and those on the bridge were relying on their ability to distinguish the silhouette of any bergs since it was too dark to actually see ice. However, testimony from the hearing(s) would later refer to what was called a “soft” horizon. Due to temperature variances between the air and water that night, the lookouts were having trouble determining exactly where the ocean and the horizon met. This “water mirage” was having the effect of hiding the iceberg’s outline as if a fog or mist until the Titanic was almost on top of it. That those charged with steering the ship did so at speed under such conditions is unconscionable.

coryhuffman

July 5th, 2016

the titanic is the worlds history forever and the beautiful ship and now what I been hearing is that they are building another one somewhere and they made a another movie titanic 2 R.I.P to all the people that lost there lives they will be mist by the world

[Reply]

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